Hoosier Pass

39°21’42”N
106°03’45”W
11,542 FEET
(3,518 M)
8.0% NB ASPHALT
SOUTH OF BRECKENRIDGE AND NORTH OF FAIRPLAY
Hoosier Pass Elevation

Hoosier Pass is in central Colorado located on the Continental Divide at the northern end of the Mosquito Range. At the top of Hoosier Pass you are surrounded by three of Colorado’s Fourteeners: Mount Cameron, Quandry Peak, and Mount Bross.

This pass is traversed by State Highway 9 between the towns of Breckenridge and Fairplay. Traveling over this pass is the alternative route from Denver to ski areas near Breckenridge and Keystone.

Suggested Route (Paved) 31.5 miles

Begin in Frisco and ride east and south on the Summit County Recreation Path
Continue riding south into Breckenridge to Watson Road--mile 9.8
Take Watson Road to Main Street, SH 9 and continue south
Continue riding south to Hoosier Pass Summit--mile 20.3
Finish riding south to Fairplay--mile 31.5

 

***(See Boreas Pass for an alternative route to capture 3 passes--Boreas, Red Hill and Hoosier)

THE CLIMB

The road over the pass has a smooth approach on the south side, but has several switchbacks on the north side with a grade of about 8 percent. The road starts out with narrow shoulders then widens at first switchback from Breckenridge to Fairplay.

NEARBY TOWNS

Breckenridge, 9.6 miles to the north
Fairplay, 11.0 miles to the south
Frisco, 20.3 miles to the north

FUN FACTS

Hoosier Pass Ski Resort opened in 1938 with only a warming hut. A restaurant and general store was later built along with an 800-foot rope tow that provided skiers access to two trails. When the rope tow broke in the 1940’s the resort closed.

HISTORY

The Fremont Expedition of June 1844 was the first documented crossing of the Continental Divide at what is today’s Hoosier Pass. The members of the expedition were led by John C. Frémont (also see Fremont Pass) as they traveled from north to south over a buffalo track. Kit Carson and Tom Fitzpatrick were his guides.

 

In 1860, miners crossed the pass from the south in search of gold in the Breckenridge area. The tradition for miners was to name geographic places after their home state. Thus, the pass was named Hoosier by prospectors from Indiana.