Iceberg Pass

40°25’03”N
105°44’46”W
11,827 FEET
(3,605 M)
ASPHALT
ON TRAIL RIDGE ROAD NEAR ESTES PARK
iceberg

The pass is crossed by U.S. Highway 34 between Grand Lake and Estes Park.

 

Alpine Visitor Center is located on Fall River Pass at the intersection of Trail Ridge Road and Old Fall River Road. Trail Ridge Road is closed during the winter and usually stays closed until late spring or early summer. (See Partner Passes: Iceberg Pass, Milner Pass and Trail Ridge High Point)

Suggested Route (Paved) 42.5 miles

Complete Milner Pass, Fall River Pass, Iceberg Pass and Trail Ridge High Point along this route.

Begin at Kawuneeche Visitor Center (Rocky Mountain National Park West entrance) near Grand Lake

Ride Trail Ridge Road to Milner Pass--mile 16.5

Continue to Alpine Visitor Center for Fall River Pass--mile 21

Fall River to Trail Ridge Road Summit/Trail Ridge High Point--mile 23

Trail Ridge High Point to Iceberg Pass--mile 24

Finish at Beaver Meadows Visitors Center--mile 42.5

THE CLIMB

Being above tree line, the pass can be windy, and 20-30 degrees colder than Estes Park or Grand Lake. The actual summit is not on the road. There is a one-way dirt road to cross over the summit. As you ride, keep your eyes open for bighorn sheep, elk, pikas, marmots, ptarmigans as well as 200 species of tiny alpine plants!

NEARBY TOWNS

Estes Park, 21 miles to the east
Grand Lake, 26 miles to the south

FUN FACTS

Iceberg Pass is a dip in the tundra area between Rock Cut and Lava Cliffs on Trail Ridge Road. You will know when you are there because there are pullovers on both sides.

 

Trail Ridge Road is the highest continuous paved road in the country.

HISTORY

The name “Trail Ridge Road” is derived from its proximity to historic pathways used by Native Americans crossing the Rocky Mountains. The Native Americans knew the route over Trail Ridge well using it to travel between their home in the west and hunting areas in the east.

 

A steep trail located on the ridge was known as “taienbaa” (“Where the Children Walked”), because it was so steep that children could not be carried and had to walk.